Everything you need to know about Clinical Trials.

What are they, why they're important and how you can get involved.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a clinical trial?

The primary objective of a clinical trial is to discover improved methods for preventing, diagnosing or treating various human conditions. Some trials help medical researchers in understanding how individuals respond to new interventions, while others allow comparisons across existing interventions, testing new treatments or combining existing interventions.

Why are clinical trials important?

Clinical trials are critical in the development of new and enhanced treatments and techniques. Many of the latest interventions would not be possible without clinical trials. These trials  help to increase life expectancy, alleviate pain, and manage disabilities.

What potential risks are involved?

Any ingested substance, including prescription medications, can lead to side effects. While every clinical study may potentially cause side effects, the good news is that all trials are meticulously monitored to ensure participant safety. Furthermore, each clinical study undergoes extensive lab testing to evaluate potential side effects.

How do I benefit from participating in a trial?

There are several benefits:

— Consulting with leading medical experts about your condition

— Gaining early access to potentially life-altering treatments

— Contribute to society by improving healthcare treatments and techniques

— Receiving reimbursement for your time and effort

Is treatment different in a clinical trial?

You should expect to undergo more exams and tests than usual. Why? These tests help the medical research team to track your progress and collect valuable information. Furthermore, you may need to stop (or modify) your current medications and diet, but changes such as this should be discussed with your medical team beforehand.

What does Informed Consent mean?

The medical professionals performing the trial will explain the treatment to you, outlining potential benefits and risks. Next, they will ask you to sign a consent form, giving your permission to participate in the trial. This document is your “informed consent.” However, keep in mind that signing this doesn’t prevent you from exiting the clinical trial. You are free to leave the trial at any time and for any reason.

Will I be paid for taking part in a trial?

In most trials you will be paid for your time and travel expenses. There is no cost to participate. The payment varies between different studies and is usually based on the number and duration of required clinic visits. The recruitment specialist will be able to advise you on the reimbursement over the phone before you book in for the trial.

What happens during a trial?

Each trial is unique. An initial phone consultation with our team will provide some trial information and includes a phone screening questionnaire. After this, a clinic visit can be scheduled for a medical eligibility check. Most trials involve medication administration and subsequent follow-up appointments for monitoring the medication’s effects. These visits may involve having a physical exam, vital signs, blood tests, urine sample, ECG and filling out questionnaires.

Why do you need my contact details, and who can access my personal information?

Your email address and phone number are required so we can call you to provide information about the trial and then ask you some eligibility questions for the trial you are interested in. These details also allow us to notify you about any relevant new studies. If you decide to participate a trial, Clinibase will share your details to the associated clinic that you have booked with. Please refer to our privacy policy for comprehensive details.

Where are the trials conducted?

Clinibase partners with multiple clinical trial sites across Australia and some sites overseas to recruit participants to their trials. To determine whether a trial is being conducted in your location, please view our Current Trials page. If no trials are currently recruiting in your area, we may in the future so feel free to keep an eye on this page or contact us to be added to our mailing list.

What happens during a screening appointment?

This appointment begins with a detailed explanation of the trial procedures, giving you an opportunity to ask any questions. If you would like to proceed, you’ll sign the Participant Information and Consent Form, followed by a medical check to confirm that you meet the eligibility criteria for the trial. Depending on the trial, the check will typically involve taking a detailed medical history, vital signs check, blood and urine samples, and performing an electrocardiogram (ECG).

Who approves the research trials?

In Australia Human Research Ethics Committees must review clinical trials before commencement. These committees are made up of members who are independent from anyone involved in the study, ensuring that the trial adheres to the highest ethical standards. Each committee must comprise of medical and research professionals, as well as laypeople and community members.

What are the phases of a clinical trial?

A standard clinical trial consists of four key phases. These phases are performed in compliance with all protocols and safety guidelines.

Phase 1

This phase covers the initial test of the new treatment or intervention. Its primary function is to evaluate safety such as assessing dosage levels and potential side effects. Typically conducted in a small group of up to 100 participants, the successful completion of Phase 1 paves the way for the transition into Phase 2.

Phase 2

Phase 2 is performed within a larger group than Phase 1. The primary objective of this phase is to determine the treatment’s effectiveness and to what degree, while also meeting and monitoring safety requirements. Once approved, Phase 3 can commence.

Phase 3

Phase 3 focuses on determining how well the treatment works – but the study now tests hundreds to thousands of individuals. This phase also involves comparing previous treatment methods to the current one being proposed. There is continuous evaluation of safety throughout.

Phase 4

Phase 4 is the final phase where there is marketing and distribution of the new treatment or technique. This phase monitors the intervention’s effectiveness within the general population while also collecting safety data about its long-term use. Further data collected can also be used to examine other conditions or explore further treatment combinations.

Are you interested in participating in a clinical trial?

When you participate, you're not just seeking new treatments; you're contributing to potentially life-changing research and paving the way for a healthier tomorrow for everyone.
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What are the phases of a clinical trial?

A standard clinical trial consists of four key phases. These phases are performed in compliance with all protocols and safety guidelines.

Phase 01.

This phase covers the initial test of the new treatment or intervention. Its primary function is to evaluate safety such as assessing dosage levels and potential side effects. Typically conducted in a small group of up to 100 participants, the successful completion of Phase 1 paves the way for the transition into Phase 2.

Phase 02.

Phase 2 is performed within a larger group than Phase 1. The primary objective of this phase is to determine the treatment’s effectiveness and to what degree, while also meeting and monitoring safety requirements. Once approved, Phase 3 can commence.

Phase 03.

Phase 3 focuses on determining how well the treatment works – but the study now tests hundreds to thousands of individuals. This phase also involves comparing previous treatment methods to the current one being proposed. There is continuous evaluation of safety throughout.

Phase 04.

Phase 4 is the final phase where there is marketing and distribution of the new treatment or technique. This phase monitors the intervention’s effectiveness within the general population while also collecting safety data about its long-term use. Further data collected can also be used to examine other conditions or explore further treatment combinations.

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